WWW.THESES.XLIBX.INFO
FREE ELECTRONIC LIBRARY - Theses, dissertations, documentation
 
<< HOME
CONTACTS



Pages:     | 1 | 2 || 4 |

«Please read this important information Contents Latest news - page 2 Cross compliance: latest news - page 6 CAP Information Service - page 7 ...»

-- [ Page 3 ] --

greenhouses or under polytunnels for later transplantation. They include:

• vine and root stock nurseries

• fruit tree nurseries

• ornamental nurseries

• commercial nurseries of forest trees (excluding those for the holding’s own requirements grown in woodland)

• nurseries of trees and bushes for planting in gardens, parks, at the road side and on embankments.

Land used to grow Christmas trees will not usually be eligible for the Basic Payment Scheme, as the trees are not grown for later transplantation.

Definitions (continued)

Short rotation coppice Short rotation coppice means areas planted with tree species of CN code 0602 90 41 that consist of woody, perennial crops, the rootstock or stools remaining in the ground after harvesting, with new shoots emerging in the following season.

The eligible species for short rotation coppice are:

• Alder (Alnus)

• Ash (Fraxinus excelsior)

• Birch (Betula)

• Hazel (Corylus avellana)

• Hornbeam (Carpinus spp)

• Lime (Tilia cordata)

• Poplar (Populus spp)

• Sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa)

• Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus)

• Willow (Salix spp) The maximum harvest cycle (the period between harvests) is 20 years.

Information on CN codes can be found on the European Commission website. Go to www.ec.europa.eu/index_en.htm and search for ‘combined nomenclature’.

Who2the rules apply to Step Work out if the rules apply to you The table below sets out whether or not the crop diversification and EFA rules apply to a farmer, depending on the amount of arable land that they have.

–  –  –

For those businesses that fall within the greening rules, there are some exemptions that may still apply. These are set out below.

The definitions of land types for the Basic Payment Scheme (BPS) are different than they were under the Single Payment Scheme (SPS). Farmers will need to be clear that these exemptions still apply using the new definitions of land types that have been set out in the last two sections (pages 12-16).

Crop diversification exemptions Under the crop diversification rules farmers may have to grow at least 2 or 3 crops on their holding.

Even if a farmer has 10 or more hectares of arable land in 2015, they may still be exempt from the crop diversification rules. The table below shows all the exemptions from these rules. If any of these apply to a farmer, they will get the greening payment without having to do anything different for crop diversification. However, they will still need to follow the permanent grassland and Ecological Focus Area rules if they apply.

Crop diversification exemptions for 2015 (similar rules will apply after 2015) Exemption A

More than 75% of your arable land will be:

• fallow land

• temporary grassland

• a combination of the above and the rest of your arable land will be 30 hectares or less Exemption B

More than 75% of your total eligible agricultural area will be:

• permanent grassland

• temporary grassland

• used for the cultivation of crops grown in water (such as Watercress)

• a combination of the above and the rest of your arable land will be 30 hectares or less.

–  –  –

Information on exemption C was published in the leaflet ‘CAP reform in England: What you need to know now’. Further decisions have been made on this and we can confirm

that any farmer who wants to use exemption C in 2015, will need to be able to show:

• pesticide application records

• fertiliser application records This evidence must be shown for each land parcel. Farmers should also provide seed labels and invoices (or other evidence of cropping), if they are available.

Following the crop diversification rules If these exemptions do not apply, farmers will need to follow the crop diversification rules. More information on this can be found at ‘Crop diversification – the rules’.

(page 22).

Ecological Focus Area exemptions Under the greening rules, some farmers may need to have Ecological Focus Areas (EFAs) on their holding. However, there are some exemptions. The table below explains all the exemptions from this rule. If any of these apply to a farmer, that farmer will get the greening payment without having to do anything different under the Ecological Focus Area rules. However, they will still have to follow the permanent grassland and crop diversification rules if they apply.

Ecological Focus Area exemptions (these will apply from 2015 onwards) Exemption A

More than 75% of your arable land will be:

• fallow land

• temporary grassland

• used for cultivation of leguminous crops (see the table on the next page)

• a combination of the above and the rest of your arable land is 30 hectares or less.

Exemption B

More than 75% of your total eligible agricultural area will be:

• permanent grassland

• temporary grassland

• used for the cultivation of crops grown in water (such as Watercress)





• a combination of the above and the rest of your arable land will be 30 hectares or less.

Exemptions (continued) Leguminous crops Examples of leguminous crops that could count towards the Ecological Focus Area exemption A (page 19) are shown in the table below. These crops will also count as nitrogen-fixing crops under the EFA rules.

–  –  –

Pasture legumes The table below shows pasture legumes. If these are grown on their own and they aren’t part of a mix they can count as a crop in their own right and they will qualify under exemption A (page 19). However, if these are grown in mixtures with grass they will have to be counted as either temporary or permanent grassland.

–  –  –

These crops will also count as nitrogen-fixing crops under the EFA rules. They also count as a crop under the crop diversification rules.

Legumes mixed with other crops If legumes are grown in mixtures with other crops, they must be counted as mixed crops.

This usually means that they can’t count as nitrogen-fixing crops for EFA (see page 28) or exemption ‘A’ (page 19).

However, if all the crops of a mixed crop are individually considered to be leguminous crops (see the list above) farmers can count the mixture as ‘mixed crop (legumes)’. ‘Mixed crop (legumes)’ can be counted as nitrogen-fixing crops for EFA and for exemption ‘A’.

The table below sets out how mixed crop (‘legumes’), mixed crop, and temporary and permanent grassland are defined, and whether they are eligible as part of an EFA.

–  –  –

Following the Ecological Focus Area (EFA) rules If none of the exemptions on page 19 apply, farmers will need to know what they need to have on their land to follow the EFA rules. More information on this can be found at ‘Ecological Focus Areas – the rules’ (page 28).

Crop diversification: the rules If farmers don’t qualify for one of the exemptions on page 18, they will need to check the number and area of crops they need to grow to meet the crop diversification rules. The

table below explains what is required, depending on the area of the holding:

–  –  –

The new EU rules require that where the arable land of a farmer covers between 10 and 30 hectares there shall be at least two different crops on different areas of that arable land over the year. Where the arable land of a farmer covers more than 30 hectares there shall be at least 3 different crops on different areas of that arable land over the year.

For the purpose of inspecting this requirement, we intend to set an inspection period of between 1 May to 30 June (also known as the “cropping period”), where the RPA will inspect a sample 5% of affected claimants.

This two month period takes account of traditional cultivation practices in England for the majority of arable crops. Farmers who have three eligible crops in the ground, in the right proportions, during this period can be confident that they will be complying with the rules. However, we also want to ensure that those who do not have all three crops planted in that period are also able to comply.

Should any crops be harvested before 30 June, the RPA will accept the presence of stubble as being evidence of a crop that has already been grown. We are also looking at the possibilities for accepting evidence if crops are not present at the time of inspection, such as physical signs or organic matter in the soil, or photographs and records.

This is one of the areas where we are seeking greater flexibility in our discussions with the European Commission.

We are also looking to establish exceptions for late-sown crops or crops with a very short growing period and we are working with the industry to devise special arrangements for non-standard crops including vining peas, maize and those vegetable and salad crops where the application of a two month inspection period is impractical due to the continuous nature of the harvest operation.

If the land is fallow throughout May and June, it can be counted as one of the crops for crop diversification.

We will provide final confirmation of the remaining details when discussions with the European Commission are completed. This is likely to be in the autumn.

What counts as a ‘crop’ for the crop diversification rules?

Under the rules a ‘crop’ can be any of the following, if they are present during the

cropping period (see above) in the Basic Payment Scheme year (the calendar year):

a) a culture of any of the different genera defined in the botanical classification of crops (see below and pages 24-25 for examples)

b) a culture of any of the species in the case of Brassicaceae, Solanaceae, and Cucurbitceae (see pages 25 and 26 for examples)

c) land lying fallow (fallow land, see page 13)

d) grasses or other herbaceous forage (temporary grassland, see page 13) Information on crops under ‘a’ and ‘b’ can be found on the next few pages. The definitions of fallow land and temporary grassland were explained in the ‘Definitions’ section on page 12 - they do count as crops under the crop diversification rules. For fallow land to qualify under the EFA rules, there is a different period when it needs to be present during the calendar year – see page 31 for more information. More information on mixed crops is on page 27.

Examples of crops in ‘a’ Some of the crops most commonly grown in England that would count under ‘a’ are listed below. This is not an exhaustive list and more examples will be added to it over the next few months. The most up to date list will be on GOV.UK: www.gov.uk/cap-reform.

–  –  –

The examples of pasture legumes on page 20 will also count as a crop under the crop diversification rules if they are grown on their own.

Examples of crops in ‘b’ Some of the crops that would count under ‘b’ (on page 23) are shown in the table below.

Individual crops within a single species count as one crop for crop diversification. For example, if you grew Cabbage and Cauliflower these are both one species, ‘Brassica oleracea’. For the crop diversification rules, these would count as one crop.

Brassicaceae

–  –  –

Spring or winter crops Spring and winter varieties of eligible crops will count as separate crops for the crop diversification rules. The National List and the Processors and Growers Research Organisation’s (PGRO) Recommended List both have details on whether a crop is a spring or winter variety.

The National List is published every year by the Food and Environment Research Agency (FERA): www.fera.defra.gov.uk/plants/publications/gazette.cfm The PGRO Recommended List is part of the National List: www.pgro.org/index.php/ If the lists do not state whether it is a spring or winter crop, it should be counted as a spring crop for the crop diversification rules.

More information on whether or not other crop types not on these lists can be classed as spring or winter varieties will be published in October.

Mixed crops The examples below explain how to count mixed crops under the crop diversification rules. Crops in fields which are split into distinct areas don’t count as mixed crops.

1. Undersowing a main crop If a main crop is undersown with a second crop, only the main crop can be counted for that area.

2. Sowing a seed mixture If there is an area where a seed mixture is sown, this area must be counted as a single crop – it doesn’t matter what crops are included in the mix.

If two different seed mixtures are grown, these can count as separate crops if:

• it can be shown that the species included in each of them are different from each other, and

• they do not fall under the definition of temporary grassland

3. Growing rows of 2 or more crops at the same time In an area of mixed crops, where 2 or more crops are grown at the same time in distinct rows, each crop can be counted as a distinct crop when it covers at least 25% of that area.

To work out the area covered by the distinct crop, the area of the mixed cropping should be divided by the number of crops which cover at least 25% of the area – it doesn’t matter what the actual share of the crop is on that area.

Mixed crops grown on temporary grassland or fallow land won’t count as mixed crops under the crop diversification rules.

Ecological Focus Areas: the rules If none of the exemptions on page 19 apply to a farmer, they will need to know what features need to be on their land to meet the Ecological Focus Area (EFA) rules.

Ecological Focus Areas are made up of areas and/or features on a holding. EFAs need to be equivalent to at least 5% of the total arable land declared on the BPS application.

Farmers can choose which areas and/or features they’ll use to make up their EFA. They

can choose from:

• buffer strips

• nitrogen-fixing crops



Pages:     | 1 | 2 || 4 |


Similar works:

«Critical Social Thinking: Policy and Practice, Vol. 2, 2010 School of Applied Social Studies, University College Cork, Ireland Review Essay Raising Princesses? Gender socialisation in early childhood and the Disney Princess franchise Ashlee Hynes, BA (Early Childhood Studies) This essay is an exploration of some of the messages portrayed to children through the Disney Princess franchise about gender roles. Gender socialisation processes in relation to the Disney Princess brand are reviewed with...»

«Life Insurance Benefits YOUR EMPLOYEE BENEFITS PLAN EARLHAM COLLEGE 2643G0 Class 1 AIG LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY ONE ALICO PLAZA WILMINGTON, DELAWARE 19801 (Herein called the Company) CERTIFICATE OF INSURANCE AIG Life Insurance Company (the Company) certifies that certain eligible persons are insured for the benefits described in this certificate. This insurance is subject to the eligibility and effective date requirements described in the ELIGIBILITY section of this certificate. IMPORTANT NOTICE...»

«UNIVERSIDAD COMPLUTENSE DE MADRID Facultad de Ciencias Políticas y Sociología Departamento de Derecho Internacional Público y Relaciones Internacionales (Estudios Internacionales) SEGURIDAD Y RELACIONES INTERNACIONALES 2º CUATRIMESTRE Curso 2012-2013 Catedrático: Antonio Marquina 1.Definición conceptual: Seguridad, Seguridad Nacional, Defensa Nacional, Seguridad Cooperativa, Seguridad Colectiva. Asociación de Seguridad. Defensa Nacional y Estudios Estratégicos 2.Tipología de los...»

«UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH POLICY 11-02-02 CATEGORY: RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION SECTION: Technology Management SUBJECT: Copyrights EFFECTIVE DATE: September 5, 2006 Revised PAGE(S): 7 I. SCOPE In the course of teaching, research and other scholarly and administrative activities at the University, faculty, staff, postdoctoral associates, students and others may create works that are protected by copyright. Federal Copyright Law provides protection for original works of authorship automatically at the...»

«Policy and Procedure Development Handbook Preface This handbook is made available to you by the Regional Policy Advisory Council (RPAC). RPAC’s mandate includes the constant review and clarification of the development process for policies and procedures. An integral aspect of the adopted approach is the desire for standardization and integration of policies and procedures. All staff must be supported and encouraged to actively use policies and procedures through accessible and up-to-date...»

«GENDER INEQUALITY IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY: LESSONS FROM PIERRE BOURDIEU Katherine Sang1 and Abigail Powell2 School of Management and Languages, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, UK Social Policy Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia Despite a range of equality legislation and initiatives, the construction industry remains one of the most male dominated sectors. Women are under-represented in all construction occupations and professions. Much of the current...»

«1 Improving the Validity of Contextualised Questions Ayesha Ahmed and Alastair Pollitt University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate Paper to be presented at the BERA Conference, Leeds, September 2001. The opinions expressed in this paper are those of the authors and should not be taken as official policy of the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate or any of its subsidiaries. Contact details Ayesha Ahmed, RED, UCLES, 1 Hills Road, Cambridge, CB1 2EU ahmed.a@ucles.org.uk...»

«Internal Party Democracy and Policy Formulation: Rationales, Trends, Relevance Paper for the ECPR Joint Sessions, Lisbon 2009, Workshop 21 Promoting Internal Party Democracy: A Selling Point, A Serious Danger, Or a Redundant Exercise? Anika Gauja Department of Government and International Relations University of Sydney a.gauja@usyd.edu.au In this paper I examine the implementation and operation of internal party democracy (IPD) in eight political parties: the Australian Labor Party, the...»

«Chapter 2 Perceptions of Policy Conceptualisations of policy vary across the field of education policy research, and sometimes even within a particular study (Ozga 1990). While understandings of policy have certainly developed and expanded over time, this is not to declare that there is a unified view on what policy ‘is’. Older ideas are not automatically supplanted by newer concepts as they emerge. Rather, a range of older and newer definitions are at work in contemporary education...»

«The Centre for Globalisation, Education and Societies is based at the University of Bristol and is coordinated by Professor Susan L. Robertson. On-Line Papers – Copyright This online paper may be cited or briefly quoted in line with the usual academic conventions, and for personal use. However, this paper must not be published elsewhere (such as mailing lists, bulletin boards etc.) without the author’s explicit permission.If you copy this paper, you must: • include this copyright note....»

«Assessment in Inclusive Settings Key Issues for Policy and Practice European Agency for Development in Special Needs Education The production of this document has been supported by the DG Education, Training, Culture and Multilingualism of the European Commission: http://europa.eu.int/comm/dgs/education_culture/index_en.htm This report was edited by Amanda Watkins, Agency Project Manager, on the basis of contributions from the Agency's Representative Board members, National Coordinators and...»

«Command Encryption Module MSS-FIPS-11-002C Security Policy Version 2.0 Command Encryption Module Security Policy Firmware Version: 2.0 This document may be copied without the author’s permission provided that it is copied in it’s entirety without any modification. Command Encryption Module Security Policy Version 2.0 Table of Contents Page 1. SCOPE OF DOCUMENT 2. CRYPTOGRAPHIC MODULE SPECIFICATION 3. MODULE PORTS AND INTERFACES 4. ROLES, SERVICES, AND AUTHENTICATION 4.1 ACCESS CONTROL...»





 
<<  HOME   |    CONTACTS
2016 www.theses.xlibx.info - Theses, dissertations, documentation

Materials of this site are available for review, all rights belong to their respective owners.
If you do not agree with the fact that your material is placed on this site, please, email us, we will within 1-2 business days delete him.