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«ROBERT F. KANABY, Publisher Bruce L. Howard and John C. Gillis, Editors NFHS Publications © 1997, 2003 By the National Federation of State High ...»

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In order to account for 48 minutes, start the receiving team’s time of possession at the time of kickoff. On all other returns, “transition time” — punt returns, blocked punts, blocked field-goal attempts, fumble returns and interceptions, including scoring plays, start ball possession at the start of the next scrimmage play.

Exception: If, at the end of the fourth period, the teams have identical scores, the tie may be resolved if a method has been approved by the state high school association. In that case, time of possession should be adjusted accordingly if timed plays are utilized. In overtime formats using alternating-possession procedures, no time of possession should be recorded.

Measuring a Scoring Drive: Scoring-drive yardage is measured from the initial LOS at the start of possession to the goal line (in the event of a touchdown) or from the initial LOS to the last LOS for field goals, not the spot from which the kick was attempted. The yardage on a successful field goal is not included in the scoring drive. Penalty plays (where the down remains the same but the ball changes position) are not included in the total number of plays in a scoring drive. However, penalty plays in which the down changes and the ball moves forward are included in the total number of plays in a scoring drive. No scoring drive should exceed the total number of yards from the initial LOS to the goal line or to the last LOS for field goals. Field goals are to be counted as a play in a drive.

SECTION I: Rushing

–  –  –

STATISTICS RULES WITH CONFIRMED

DECISIONS

Provision 2: Any player who carries the ball is credited with plus or minus yardage from the LOS to the spot where the ball is declared dead in the player’s possession or is recovered by the opponent.

(See SECTION 5: Fumbles) CD 1: Team A has the ball at the 50-yard line. Player A takes a handoff and advances to Team B’s 45-yard line. Player A is credited with 5 yards rushing.

CD 2: Team A has the ball at the 50-yard line. Player A takes a handoff and is downed at Team A’s 48-yard line. Player A is credited with minus 2 yards rushing.

CD 3: Team A has the ball at the 50-yard line. Player A1 takes a handoff and fumbles, and it is recovered by Player A1, Player A2 or Player B at Team B’s 45. Player A1 is credited with 5 yards rushing.

Provision 3: In a run-option play involving a pitch behind the LOS to the trailing back, credit the trailing back with the rush attempt and total yardage gained or lost, measured from the LOS, regardless of where the player obtains the pitch. The player who pitches is not credited with a rush attempt or yardage.

CD 1: Team A’s ball on Team B’s 30-yard line. Player A1 advances to the 26-yard line and, in the scorer’s opinion, makes an errant pitch to Player A2, who is downed on the 29. Credit Player A1 with a rush of 1 yard.

CD 2: Team A’s ball on its 40-yard line. On a pitchout, Player A1 tosses the ball behind Player A2. Player A2 recovers the ball on Team A’s 30-yard line and advances to Team A’s 34-yard line.

Charge Player A1 with a rush of minus 6 yards. Charge Team A with a fumble not lost.

Provision 4: Any backward pass beyond the LOS during a rushing play causes two players to be credited with rushing yardage, but only one player is to be credited with a “time carried.” The player 14 Football advancing the ball beyond the LOS is credited with a “time carried” and with the yardage to the spot where his backward pass is caught.

The player receiving the backward pass does not receive credit for a “time carried” but does receive credit for the yardage from the spot where the player catches the backward pass to the spot where the ball is declared dead in the player’s possession. (Note: See Fumbles) CD 1: From the 50-yard line, Player A1 advances to Team B’s 30yard line where Player A1 passes backward to Player A2 who catches the ball at Team B’s 32-yard line. Player A2 then advances to Team B’s 25-yard line and is downed. Player A1 is credited with a “time carried” and with 18 yards rushing. Player A2 is credited with 7 yards rushing but no “time carried.” Provision 5: Any backward pass (underhand or otherwise) behind the LOS results in the player receiving the backward pass being credited for all yardage gained or lost. This would be rushing yardage lost, not passing. If the backward pass hits the ground, it should be recorded as a fumble. If the opposition recovers the ball, the person throwing the pass is credited with negative rushing yards to the point where the opposition recovers the ball.

CD 1: From the 50-yard line, Player A1 passes back to Player A2 behind the LOS, and Player A2 is downed at Team A’s 45-yard line. Player A2 is credited with a loss of 5 yards.

CD 2: From the 50-yard line, Player A1 passes back to Player A2 behind the LOS, and Player A2 advances to Team B’s 40-yard line. Player A2 is credited with a gain of 10 yards.

SECTION 2: Passing

Provision 1: Yardage during a pass is credited to both the passer (passing) and to the receiver (receiving). It is figured from the LOS to the spot where the ball is declared dead in the receiver’s possession (Note: See Fumbles).

CD 1: From the 50-yard line, Player A passes complete to Player A2 at Team B’s 30-yard line. Player A2 advances to Team B’s 20-yard line and is tackled. Credit Player A with a completed Football 15 pass and 30 yards passing and Player A2 with a pass caught and 30 receiving yards.





CD 2: From the 50-yard line, Player A passes complete to Player A3 at Team A’s 45-yard line, where Player A3 is downed immediately. Credit Player A with a completed pass and minus 5 yards passing, and credit Player A3 with a pass caught and minus 5 receiving yards.

Provision 2: Forward passing gains or losses are measured from the LOS to the point where the ball is declared dead (or is recovered by opponents in the case of a fumble) so as to include both the length of the pass and running advance after completion. All yards gained or lost on each completed pass play are credited to both passer and receiver.

Provision 3: Any loss by a player apparently intending to pass, but downed behind the LOS, is recorded as “Loss by Rushing.” The player is not a passer until the player has thrown the ball, since a player retains at all times the option of running.

Provision 4: Interception returns are measured from the point of interception to the point where the ball is declared dead (or is recovered by opponents in the case of a fumble).

Provision 5: There is no pass completed by penalty.

Provision 6: Whenever a player attempting to pass is tackled behind the LOS, that player is charged with a “time carried” and minus rushing yards. The player remains a runner until the ball is thrown.

When a pass is intercepted, the passer is credited with an incomplete pass and is charged with an intercepted pass with no yardage recorded for Team A.

CD 1: Team A has the ball on the 50-yard line, and a pass from Player A is intercepted by Player B on Team B’s 30-yard line.

Player A is credited with an incomplete pass and is charged with an intercepted pass. Player A is credited with no yardage.

Provision 7: Any backward pass beyond the LOS during a passing play following a completed pass causes two players to be credited with receiving yards, but only one player may be credited with a pass caught. The player receiving the forward pass is credited with a 16 Football pass caught and the receiving yards from the LOS to the spot where the backward pass is caught. The player receiving the backward pass is not credited with a reception but is credited with receiving yards from the spot where the backward pass is caught to the spot

where the ball is declared dead in the player’s possession (Note:

See Fumbles).

CD 1: From the 50-yard line, Player A passes complete to Player A2 who advances to Team B’s 35-yard line where Player A2 passes backward to Player A3 who catches the ball on Team B’s 38-yard line and advances to Team B’s 20-yard line before being tackled. Credit Player A with a completed pass and 30 yards passing. Player A2 is credited with a pass caught and 12 receiving yards. Player A3 is not credited with a pass caught, but is credited with 18 receiving yards.

Provision 8: A fake field-goal attempt that results in the holder passing the ball forward to an eligible receiver is credited as a passing play.

SECTION 3: First Downs

Provision 1: Any time the ball is advanced beyond the line-to-gain (forward stake) during a scrimmage play, a first down is recorded, provided a) the forward stake is in the field of play (between the goal lines), or b) a live-ball penalty during the play does not move the ball back behind the forward stake. This includes a touchdown play.

CD 1: With second and 5 at the 50-yard line, Player A advances to Team B’s 39-yard line where Player A is tackled. Credit Player A with 11 yards rushing and Team A with a first down.

CD 2: With second and 5 at the 50-yard line, Player A advances to Team B’s 30-yard line, but there is clipping by Player A2 at Team B’s 32-yard line. Player A is credited with 18 yards rushing (to the spot of the foul) but no first down, because enforcement of the penalty brings the ball back behind the forward stake.

Football 17 CD 3: With second and 5 at the 50-yard line, Player A advances to Team B’s 25-yard line, but there is clipping at Team B’s 29yard line. Player A is credited with 21 yards rushing (to the spot of the foul) and a first down, because the ball is beyond the forward stake at Team B’s 44-yard line.

Provision 2: A first down may be gained by penalty measurement during or following a scrimmage play. If a first down is gained by a penalty or by yardage gained and another penalty moves the ball beyond what would be the forward stake after the original first down, then two first downs are credited.

CD 1: On third down and 2 yards to go for a first down at Team B’s 25-yard line, Player A1 runs the ball to Team B’s 32-yard line. Team B receives a 15-yard penalty on the play. Player A is awarded 7 yards rushing, and Team A is awarded the ball on Team B’s 47-yard line and two first downs.

Provision 3: A first down is not recorded when a resultant loss of team possession occurs on a scrimmage play, even though the gain provides yardage necessary for a first down.

CD 1: Team A had the ball on Team B’s 40-yard line, second and

5. Player A rushes for 10 yards then fumbles, and Team B recovers the ball on its 30-yard line. Credit Player A with a rush of 10 yards, but do not credit Team A with a first down by rushing. Charge Team A with a fumble lost.

Provision 4: A first down may be gained by penalty measurement during or following a scrimmage play.

CD 1: With second and 5 from the 50-yard line, Player A passes complete to Player A2 who is downed at Team B’s 46-yard line where Player B piles on. The pass was short of the first down, but the 15-yard penalty for the foul by Player B gives Team A a first down by penalty.

CD 2: With second and 5 from the 50-yard line, Player A passes complete to Player A2, and Player A2 is downed at Team B’s 30-yard line where Player B2 piles on. The completed pass was beyond the line-to-gain for a first down by passing, and the subsequent 15-yard penalty for piling on results in a first 18 Football down by penalty.

Provision 5: On the last play of the second or fourth quarter, if, in the scorer’s judgment, the offensive team advanced the ball to a first down, credit is given whether or not the officials so signify.

SECTION 4: Kickoff and Kick Returns Kickoff Provision 1: No yardage is recorded for the kicker on the kickoff. This includes a place kick following a safety.

Kick Returns Provision 2: Returns are measured from the point where the returning player first gained or lost possession of the ball (using the back foot as a starting point) to the point where the ball is declared dead or is lost by a fumble. Return yardage on a free kick after a safety goes into the kickoff return category.

Provision 3: If a ball is muffed following a fair-catch signal, there can be no return and no fumble charged to the receiving team.

Provision 4: On a multi-player kick return exchange when there is no attempt by the first player (or the second if more than two are involved) to advance the kick (even though there may be an advance in order to effect a handoff or a lateral), credit the last player handling the ball with the return and yardage. Compute the yardage from the point nearest the receiving team’s goal line where the player gained possession.

Provision 5: When a player advances a kick, then laterals and a loss of yardage occurs on the play (determined from the point of the original possession), credit the first returnee with the return and minus yardage. When, after a lateral, the second player contributes to an additional loss of yardage on the return, credit the player with no return and minus yardage.

Provision 6: When a player on the receiving team, who is trying to gain possession, touches (muffs) a kick, credit that player with a return and yardage gained or lost from the point where the ball was first Football 19 touched. Charge the receiving team with a fumble. Measure the distance of the punt to that point, not to the point of ultimate recovery by either team.

CD 1: Team A has the ball on its 30-yard line. Player B misjudges Player A’s punt at Team B’s 30-yard line. The ball grazes Player B’s fingertips and rolls to the 20-yard line, where Player A1 recovers. Charge Player B with a punt return of minus 10 yards. Credit Player A with a 40-yard punt. Charge Team B with a fumble lost.

CD 2: Team A’s ball on Team B’s 45-yard line. Player B tries to catch Player A’s punt on Team B’s 10-yard line, and the ball bounces off (or through) Player B’s hands into the end zone for a touchback. Credit Player A with a 35-yard punt. Credit Player B with a punt return of minus 10 yards. Charge Team B with a fumble not lost.



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