WWW.THESES.XLIBX.INFO
FREE ELECTRONIC LIBRARY - Theses, dissertations, documentation
 
<< HOME
CONTACTS



Pages:   || 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 |

«Unlocking Potential for Learning Unlocking Potential for Learning Effective District-Wide Strategies to Raise Student Achievement Project Report in ...»

-- [ Page 1 ] --

Ontario

The Literacy and Numeracy Secretariat

Le Secrétariat de la littératie et de la numératie

Unlocking Potential for Learning

Unlocking Potential

for Learning

Effective District-Wide Strategies

to Raise Student Achievement

Project Report

in Literacy and Numeracy

Project Report

Series Editors:

Carol Campbell

Michael Fullan

Avis Glaze

Unlocking Potential

for Learning

Effective District-Wide Strategies

to Raise Student Achievement

in Literacy and Numeracy

Project Report:

Carol Campbell and Michael Fullan

Series Editors:

Carol Campbell Michael Fullan Avis Glaze

CONTENTS

Preface

Introduction

Project Report

The Effective District-Wide Strategies to Raise Student Achievement in Literacy and Numeracy Project

1. District’s Strategy and Actions

2. Connections Between District and Schools

3. Impact of District’s Strategies and Actions and Future Developments

The Eight Districts

Effective District-Wide Strategies to Raise Student Achievement in Literacy and Numeracy: Key Components

A. Leading with Purpose and Focusing Direction

1. Leadership for learning

2. Vision and shared focus on student achievement as the priority

3. Moral purpose informing practices to unlock potential for system, school, and student development

B. Designing a Coherent Strategy, Co-ordinating Implementation, and Reviewing Outcomes

4. Overarching strategy

5. Resources prioritized to focus on improved student achievement

6. Effective district organization

7. System and school-level monitoring, review, feedback, and accountability

C. Developing Precision in Knowledge, Skills, and Daily Practices for Improving Learning

Cette publication est disponible en francais

8. Capacity building and professional learning for teachers and principals

9. Curriculum development, instruction, and interventions to improve teaching and learning for all students

10. Use of data and development of assessment literacy

D. Sharing Responsibility through Building Partnerships

11. Positive and purposeful partnerships

12. Communication

Unlocking the Potential of District-Wide Reform

Schools and school systems all across the world are seeking ways of improving student achievement to respond to the growing public recognition of the importance of education for individual and societal progress and success. Ontario has adopted an exciting approach to supporting school improvement that is research and evidence based. Unlike many jurisdictions around the world that have adopted simplistic practices, Ontario has recognized that sustained improvement depends on schools, districts, and provinces adopting an aligned approach that builds the capacity of teachers, school leaders, boards, district leaders, parents, and community allies.

Ontario is putting that approach into practice in elementary schools through the Literacy and Numeracy Strategy and Secretariat, and in secondary schools through the Student Success Strategy. In both strategies, the Ministry of Education is closely working with schools and school districts to develop common approaches to meaningful change focused on improved school and classroom practices. We recognize that within these broad parameters there can be many different ways to proceed, taking into account the diverse demographics and contexts of Ontario schools.

The initial evidence is that these strategies are working. All the indicators of student progress are improving, and there is a renewed sense of energy and optimism in schools about the future. At the same time, we recognize that we are only at the beginning of the road.

The case studies in this collection illustrate the terrific work being done in boards as well as the significant challenges that must be addressed. The researchers and authors describe in detail the strategies being used by boards to create enthusiasm, to build teacher skills, to develop strong leadership, to involve the community, and to use data to guide improvement. They show that improvement must always be a collective effort no matter how significant a role some individuals may play.

They show that the school cannot do it alone although the school must also be committed to the possibility of improvement. They show the importance of tenacity and, as Robert Slavin put it, “the unrelenting pursuit of success for students.”

PROJECT REPORT

The cases in the Unlocking Potential for Learning series also show that while this great work is going on boards and schools must also manage a diverse range of other tasks and pressures. The realities of day-to-day schooling and board management cannot be left unattended either. It is indeed a fine balancing act, but these very diverse cases show how it can be – is being – done. They provide inspiration, ideas, and a map of sorts for other school leaders while also making it clear that the route will look a little different in each situation.





I am honoured to write some words of introduction to this collection, but even more to work with Ontario educators and communities for the benefit of our children.

No cause is more worthy of our effort.

Ben Levin Deputy Minister of Education September, 2006

4 EFFECTIVE DISTRICT-WIDE STRATEGIES TO RAISE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

IN LITERACY AND NUMERACY

INTRODUCTION

This publication contains the overall report from the Effective District-Wide Strategies to Raise Student Achievement in Literacy and Numeracy research project conducted by The Literacy and Numeracy Secretariat. The purpose of this project was to identify school boards that are demonstrating improvements in literacy and numeracy and to evaluate the strategies, actions, and outcomes associated with such improvements.

Eight school boards participated in the project – all boards are demonstrating improved student achievement. The boards were also selected because they represent the diversity of contexts and experiences in Ontario – urban/suburban/rural locations, small/medium/large numbers of schools, public/Catholic systems, French/English language and with improvement starting from existing higher or lower achievement levels. A selection of case study reports with details of strategies, practices, and outcomes in individual districts will also be published as part of the Unlocking Potential for Learning series.

We want to express our thanks to the directors of education in each of the eight districts for agreeing to participate in this project. We want also to thank all the educators we met with in these districts and schools for their insights and willingness to discuss effective strategies and for their work every day to support student achievement. We want to acknowledge also our colleagues on the Effective District Strategies project team, Dr. Carmen Maggisano and Dr. Carolyn Rees-Potter, Student Achievement Officers with The Literacy and Numeracy Secretariat, and Professor Marie Josée Berger of the University of Ottawa, and to thank them for their contributions to the case studies and to the project overall.

In this introduction, we put the Effective District Strategies project into context by outlining the provincial commitment and strategy for raising student achievement in literacy and numeracy.

In 2003, as part of a new government initiative, Ontario launched a major provincewide strategy to achieve substantial improvements in student achievement in literacy and numeracy. The starting point for reform was a five-year period of limited

–  –  –

A key element of the government’s strategy included the establishment of The Literacy and Numeracy Secretariat to work in partnership with school districts and schools to support improvement in student achievement. Nine key strategies have

underpinned The Secretariat’s work:

1. Work with school boards to set achievement targets.

2. Assemble and support teams at all levels to drive continuous improvement in literacy and numeracy.

3. Reduce class sizes in the primary grades to a maximum of 20 students per class by 2007–2008.

4. Build capacity to support student learning and achievement.

5. Allocate resources to support target setting and improvement planning for literacy and numeracy.

6. Mobilize the system to provide equity in student outcome.

7. Embark on a process of community outreach and engagement to build support for the literacy and numeracy initiative.

8. Demonstrate a commitment to research and evidence-based inquiry and decision making.

9. Establish a growing presence on the national and international scene in learning from and contributing to the knowledge base about how to improve literacy and numeracy achievement.

The proposition was how to mobilize trilevel engagement in improvement involving the school and community, the district, and the government. We undertook to proactively use the change knowledge – what we call “capacity building with a focus on results” – to achieve major results within a short period of time. Some schools and districts were already moving in this direction – in this sense they were ahead of the government, but the new goal was to have system-wide change in all districts and school authorities.

6 EFFECTIVE DISTRICT-WIDE STRATEGIES TO RAISE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

IN LITERACY AND NUMERACY

The Secretariat is committed to fostering inquiry and identification of effective practices. This is reflected in our mission to challenge ourselves, educators, and the community to seek out best thinking and build upon effective practices to maximize student achievement in literacy and numeracy. One initiative along these lines – the one we report here – was to identify what is known on the ground about districtwide reform. We set out to identify districts that a) had seemed to have sound strategies at work and b) were getting results as indicated by trends in EQAO assessments. What we wanted to know was what was going on under different conditions as districts went about this difficult and important work. The district case studies reported on in this series are part of our strategic approach to inquiry in which we derive lessons from Ontario’s education system on an ongoing basis and report these findings and learning back to Ontario’s educators to inform practice and contribute to improvement. We know that together we can make a significant difference for student achievement through unlocking potential for learning.

PROJECT REPORTProject Report

This is a cross-case analysis of eight case studies of districts in Ontario, Canada, that are attempting to achieve district-wide improvement in literacy and numeracy at the elementary school level. We first put the study in context, then describe what we did and what we found, including lessons learned, and then take up next steps.

In 2003, as part of a new government initiative, Ontario launched a major, province wide-strategy to achieve substantial improvements in literacy and numeracy. The starting point for reform was a five-year period of limited improvement in performance where the overall percentage of 12-year-olds (Grade 6) achieving proficiency in literacy and numeracy was about 54%, based on provincial assessments carried out by the independent Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO).

In the fall of 2003, the new government launched a strategy designed to achieve major improvements in all elementary schools in the 72 districts that make up the public education system (English, and French language, public and Catholic).

The strategy includes:

• Setting a target of 75% of 12 year old students achieving at or above the provincial standard for 2008.

• Establishing The Literacy and Numeracy Secretariat to work in a two-way partnership with districts and schools.

• Adding considerable new resources for literacy and numeracy, including materials, professional development, staffing, and initiatives linked to local and provincial needs.

• Negotiating, through The Secretariat, yearly aspirational targets and board improvement plans with each district.

• Engaging in capacity building, which includes focusing on district and school strategies for achieving improvement, such as developing school improvement teams, strengthening the role of the principal, helping schools develop collaborative learning cultures, and increasing assessment for learning capabilities at the school, district, and provincial level.

8 EFFECTIVE DISTRICT-WIDE STRATEGIES TO RAISE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

IN LITERACY AND NUMERACY

• Fostering lateral capacity-building, where schools and districts learn from each other about effective instructional practices in literacy and numeracy, and learn about effective change strategies for school- and district-wide improvement.

• Fostering a commitment to both raising overall student achievement levels and pursuing equity of outcomes by raising the bar and closing the gap in educational performance.

• A commitment to drawing on the wider knowledge base to inform the strategies, as well as a commitment to use knowledge to inform decisions as the strategy unfolded and to contribute to the growing knowledge base about large-scale reform.

The proposition was how to mobilize trilevel engagement in improvement involving the school and community, the district, and the government. The government undertook to proactively use the change knowledge – what we call “capacity building with a focus on results” – to achieve major results within a short period of time.

Some schools and districts were already moving in this direction. In this sense they were ahead of the government, but the new goal was to have system-wide change in all 72 districts.



Pages:   || 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 |


Similar works:

«The Leisure Suit Larry 6 Script This script was purely made out of fondness for one of Larry's underestimated adventures: Shape Up Or Slip Out!The lines in each header are ordered by verb: starting with: 0 (upon coming in) 1 look 2 talk to 4 hand 5 pick up 6 zipper From that point on, the lines are enticed by clicking inventory items on it: unless it's blatantly obvious, I'll list what object you need to do before getting that line. Index Introduction 2 Inventory 4 Front Desk 13 Hotel Room 201...»

«REFLECTED BEST SELF EXERCISE — Inspired by research at the Center for Positive Organizations. Applied by people and organizations worldwide.ROBERT E. QUINN JA NE E. DUTTON G RETCHEN M. S PRE I TZE R AND LAUR A MO RGAN RO BE RTS Revised by positiveorgs.bus.umich.edu E MILY J. PLEWS AND JA NET M AX ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We wish to acknowledge our collaborators, Brianna Barker Caza, Ph.D., and Emily Heaphy, Ph.D., for their contributions to our ongoing research on the Reflected Best Self Exercise™...»

«A Plasma Aerocapture and Entry System for Manned Missions and Planetary Deep Space Orbiters MSNW LLC A Plasma Aerocapture and Entry System for Manned Missions and Planetary Deep Space Orbiters Phase I Final Report PREPARED BY: David Kirtley MSNW LLC. 8551 154th Ave NE Redmond, WA 98052 Phone: (425) 867 8900 Email: dkirtley@msnwllc.com Contract Number: NNX12AR12G Report Number: Final Report DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A – Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited.. 1 A Plasma Aerocapture and Entry...»

«Continued Development of the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) J. Gary Wood1, Kyle Wilson1 and Andrew Buffalino1 Sunpower, Inc. 182 Mill Street, Athens, OH 45701 Wayne A Wong2 NASA-Glenn Research Center. 21000 Brookpark Road, Cleveland OH 44135 Patrick Frye3 and Dan Matejczyk3 Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne. 6633Canoga Ave, Canoga Park, CA 91309 and L. B. Penswick4 Consultant. 121 Carefree Drive, Stevenson, WA 98648 Abstract. The Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) is being developed under contract...»

«Catalogue no. 12-590-X Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) Canada How to obtain more information For information about this product or the wide range of services and data available from Statistics Canada, visit our website at www.statcan.gc.ca, e-mail us at infostats@statcan.gc.ca, or telephone us, Monday to Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., at the following numbers: Statistics Canada's National Contact Centre Toll-free telephone (Canada and the United States): Inquiries line...»

«Inspection report for Goodway Nursery School & Children's Centre Local authority Birmingham Inspection number 383502 Inspection dates 12–13 October 2011 Reporting inspector Anna Coyle Centre leader Beth O'Neill Date of previous inspection Not applicable Centre address 5 Goodway Road Birmingham B44 8RL Telephone number 0121 4643078 Fax number 0121 4642080 Email address enquiry@goodwayn.bham.sch.uk Linked school if applicable Goodway Nursery School Linked early years and Not applicable...»

«The Morrisby Careers Adviser Network This pack contains information about The Morrisby Organisation, Morrisby Direct and applying to join the Morrisby Careers Adviser Network.It contains the following documents:  An overview of The Morrisby Organisation  What is the Morrisby Careers Adviser Network?  Appendix 1 – Activities undertaken by Morrisby Careers Advisers  Appendix 2 – Person specification for Morrisby Careers Adviser  Terms and Conditions of the Morrisby Careers...»

«505 INFACON 7, Trondheim, Norway, June 1995 Eds.: Tuset, Tveit and Page Publishers: FFF, Trondheim, Norway INTELLIGENT CONTROL OF SUBMERGED-ARC FURNACES Markus A. Reuter, Carla Pretorius, Cobus Klapper, Myles S. Rennie and Ian 1. Barker Measurement and Control Division, Mintek, 2125 Randburg, South Africa ABSTRACT This paper is devoted to the discussion of an intelligent submerged-arc control system that relates the metallurgical and electrical parameters to the control loops. Futhermore, the...»

«D-1/ARO SOM01.1 (5/2005) THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK SOM01.1 (5/2005) D-2/ARO Section Page 9.1 Gas Chromatograph (GC) Operation Conditions –  –  – 1.0 SCOPE AND APPLICATION 1.1 In 1978, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Headquarters and Regional representatives designed analytical methods for the analysis of chlorinated pesticides and Aroclors in hazardous waste samples. These methods were based on USEPA Method 608, Organochlorine Pesticides, and Polychlorinated...»

«West Oxford Community Primary School Parent Handbook 2014-15 Headteacher Ms Clare Bladen Contents Introduction Contact Us The School Day Attendance and Punctuality Staff Children’s Welfare Home-School Communication and Partnership Curriculum Positive Relationships and Behaviour Playtime Lunchtime School Wear and Appearance Parental Involvement Supporting Your Child’s Education at Home Clubs and Educational Visits Secondary Transfer Policies & Additional Information Introduction West Oxford...»

«AT/DEC/1052 United Nations Administrative Tribunal Distr.: Limited 25 July 2002 English Original: French ADMINISTRATIVE TRIBUNAL Judgement No. 1052 Case No. 1138: BONDER Against: The Secretary-General of the United Nations THE ADMINISTRATIVE TRIBUNAL OF THE UNITED NATIONS, Composed of: Mr. Julio Barboza, Vice-President, presiding; Mr. Spyridon Flogaitis; Ms. Brigitte Stern; Whereas, on 4 April 2000, Glenio Bonder, a former staff member of the United Nations Environment Programme (hereinafter...»

«Docket Item #7 BAR CASE# 2005-0055 BAR Meeting April 27, 2005 Addition and alterations ISSUE: Nensi Fiorenini & Scott Singleton APPLICANT: 421 North Fayette Street LOCATION: RB/Residential ZONE: BOARD ACTION, MARCH 23, 2005: The Board combined the discussion of docket item #'s 7 & 8. On a motion by Mr. Zuckerkandel, seconded by Ms. Sample, the Board deferred the application for restudy. The vote on the motion was 6-0. REASON: The Board agreed with the Staff analysis and believed that the...»





 
<<  HOME   |    CONTACTS
2016 www.theses.xlibx.info - Theses, dissertations, documentation

Materials of this site are available for review, all rights belong to their respective owners.
If you do not agree with the fact that your material is placed on this site, please, email us, we will within 1-2 business days delete him.